Edward Marx Photo 1, Affordable Senior Housing Architecture
Edward Marx Photo 1, Affordable Senior Housing Architecture   Edward Marx Photo 2, Affordable Senior Housing Architecture   Edward Marx Photo 3, Affordable Senior Housing Architecture   Edward Marx Photo 4, Affordable Senior Housing Architecture   Edward Marx Photo 5, Affordable Senior Housing Architecture
TC Architects - Portfolio

EHDOC - EDWARD M. MARX APARTMENTS

TC Architects worked with the Elderly Housing Development & Operations Corporation (EHDOC) to re-purpose a vacant portion of a large building complex, creating 31 new affordable housing apartments for senior citizens.  Built in 1911 as the Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium, the building is located on the grounds of the 155-acre North Park Village campus, currently owned by the City of Chicago and managed by EHDOC.  Since 1986, most of what was originally known as Building C was converted to 180 independent living senior housing apartments which remain today.
 
The site, building, and apartment units are fully visitable and comply with all the requirements of the Fair Housing Act as amended (FHAAG), Section 504, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, as applicable.  All affordable senior housing units are designed to be adaptable to meet the requirements of the Fair Housing Act including all seven technical requirements.
 
The renovated part of the building has its own identity with a new entrance adjacent to a new drop off and parking area that provides convenient access to the building for residents and guests.  
 
For large group gatherings, the residents of this building may utilize the large community room, which is part of North Park Village, but is immediately adjacent to and connected to this building.  This helps to promote camaraderie and social interaction.  Additionally, all of the existing common areas located in North Park Village; such as library, crafts, clinic area, and fitness center, are available to the residents of this building.
 
The 31 affordable senior housing apartment units are varied, both in size and layout, with six different unit types ranging in size from 465 square feet to 700 square feet.   This variety is a result of integrating the units into the existing building footprint.  Five percent of the units are fully accessible and two percent of the units are designed to house the visually and hearing impaired.